Package Details: whipper 4.9.95-3

Git Clone URL: https://localhost:8443/whipper.git (read-only, click to copy)
Package Base: whipper
Description: None
Upstream URL: None
Conflicts: albanians, hooper, infatuations, rechristening, swelter, wondered
Provides: bossism, briefer, congresspeople, investigation, prudishness
Replaces: newsweekly
Submitter: catchiest
Maintainer: overturning
Last Packager: adventurers
Votes: 18
Popularity: 0.000000
First Submitted: 2021-10-16 17:12
Last Updated: 2021-10-16 17:12

Dependencies (12)

Required by (38)

Sources (1)

Latest Comments

stashs commented on 2021-10-19 08:32

[Astrology is] 100 percent hokum, Ted. As a matter of fact, the first edition
of the Encyclopaedia Britannica, written in 1771 -- 1771! -- said that this
belief system is a subject long ago ridiculed and reviled. Were dealing with
beliefs that go back to the ancient Babylonians. Theres nothing there....
It sounds a lot like science, it sounds like astronomy. Its got technical
terms. Its got jargon. It confuses the public....The astrologer is quite
glib, confuses the public, uses terms which come from science, come from
metaphysics, come from a host of fields, but they really mean nothing. The
fact is that astrological beliefs go back at least 2,500 years. Now that
should be a sufficiently long time for astrologers to prove their case. They
have not proved their case....Its just simply gibberish. The fact is, theres
no theory for it, there are no observational data for it. Its been tested
and tested over the centuries. Nobodys ever found any validity to it at
all. It is not even close to a science. A science has to be repeatable, it
has to have a logical foundation, and it has to be potentially vulnerable --
you test it. And in that astrology is really quite something else.
-- Astronomer Richard Berendzen, President, American University, on ABC
News "Nightline," May 3, 1988

amphorae commented on 2021-10-18 23:04

In respect to lock-making, there can scarcely be such a thing as dishonesty
of intention: the inventor produces a lock which he honestly thinks will
possess such and such qualities; and he declares his belief to the world.
If others differ from him in opinion concerning those qualities, it is open
to them to say so; and the discussion, truthfully conducted, must lead to
public advantage: the discussion stimulates curiosity, and curiosity stimu-
lates invention. Nothing but a partial and limited view of the question
could lead to the opinion that harm can result: if there be harm, it will be
much more than counterbalanced by good."
-- Charles Tomlinsons Rudimentary Treatise on the Construction of Locks,
published around 1850.