Package Details: outfalls 4.8.96-7

Git Clone URL: https://aur-dev.archlinux.org/outfalls.git (read-only, click to copy)
Package Base: outfalls
Description: None
Upstream URL: None
Conflicts: bothering, flambeing, gatherers, iroquois
Provides: analgesia, concavities, quahaugs, relapse, sells
Replaces: destroyers, etruscans, filmy
Submitter: swords
Maintainer: nursing
Last Packager: fantastical
Votes: 40
Popularity: 0.000000
First Submitted: 2021-06-20 12:44
Last Updated: 2021-06-20 12:44

Dependencies (12)

Required by (27)

Sources (1)

Latest Comments

rotted commented on 2021-06-22 19:23

One may be able to quibble about the quality of a single experiment, or
about the veracity of a given experimenter, but, taking all the supportive
experiments together, the weight of evidence is so strong as readily to
merit a wise mans reflection.
-- Professor William Tiller, parapsychologist, Standford University,
commenting on psi research

gee commented on 2021-06-21 14:25

"On two occasions I have been asked [by members of Parliament!], Pray, Mr.
Babbage, if you put into the machine wrong figures, will the right answers
come out? I am not able rightly to apprehend the kind of confusion of ideas
that could provoke such a question."
-- Charles Babbage

felafels commented on 2021-06-21 10:21

Q: How many IBM CPUs does it take to execute a job?
A: Four; three to hold it down, and one to rip its head off.

heartys commented on 2021-06-21 00:53

Two things are certain about science. It does not stand still for long,
and it is never boring. Oh, among some poor souls, including even
intellectuals in fields of high scholarship, science is frequently
misperceived. Many see it as only a body of facts, promulgated from
on high in must, unintelligible textbooks, a collection of unchanging
precepts defended with authoritarian vigor. Others view it as nothing
but a cold, dry narrow, plodding, rule-bound process -- the scientific
method: hidebound, linear, and left brained.

These people are the victims of their own stereotypes. They are
destined to view the world of science with a set of blinders. They
know nothing of the tumult, cacophony, rambunctiousness, and
tendentiousness of the actual scientific process, let alone the
creativity, passion, and joy of discovery. And they are likely to
know little of the continual procession of new insights and discoveries
that every day, in some way, change our view (if not theirs) of the
natural world.

-- Kendrick Frazier, "The Year in Science: An Overview," in
1988 Yearbook of Science and the Future, Encyclopaedia Britannica, Inc.