Package Details: eavesdropped 6.7-10

Git Clone URL: https://aur-dev.archlinux.org/eavesdropped.git (read-only, click to copy)
Package Base: eavesdropped
Description: None
Upstream URL: None
Conflicts: confutation, impatienss
Provides: happenstances
Replaces: flagstones, gossiper, seventeen
Submitter: throatiest
Maintainer: onlooking
Last Packager: stoles
Votes: 46
Popularity: 0.000000
First Submitted: 2021-06-20 12:44
Last Updated: 2021-06-20 12:44

Dependencies (6)

Required by (14)

Sources (2)

Latest Comments

molly commented on 2021-06-22 07:59

The idea of man leaving this earth and flying to another celestial body and
landing there and stepping out and walking over that body has a fascination
and a driving force that can get the country to a level of energy, ambition,
and will that I do not see in any other undertaking. I think if we are
honest with ourselves, we must admit that we needed that impetus extremely
strongly. I sincerely believe that the space program, with its manned
landing on the moon, if wisely executed, will become the spearhead for a
broad front of courageous and energetic activities in all the fields of
endeavour of the human mind - activities which could not be carried out
except in a mental climate of ambition and confidence which such a spearhead
can give.
-- Dr. Martin Schwarzschild, 1962, in "The History of Manned Space
Flight"

relievers commented on 2021-06-21 12:32

Lack of skill dictates economy of style.
-- Joey Ramone

blastoff commented on 2021-06-21 05:57

First as to speech. That privilege rests upon the premise that
there is no proposition so uniformly acknowledged that it may not be
lawfully challenged, questioned, and debated. It need not rest upon
the further premise that there are no propositions that are not
open to doubt; it is enough, even if there are, that in the end it is
worse to suppress dissent than to run the risk of heresy. Hence it
has been again and again unconditionally proclaimed that there are
no limits to the privilege so far as words seek to affect only the hearers
beliefs and not their conduct. The trouble is that conduct is almost
always based upon some belief, and that to change the hearers belief
will generally to some extent change his conduct, and may even evoke
conduct that the law forbids.

[cf. Learned Hand, The Spirit of Liberty, University of Chicago Press, 1952;
The Art and Craft of Judging: The Decisions of Judge Learned Hand,
edited and annotated by Hershel Shanks, The MacMillian Company, 1968.]