Package Details: chugs 9.8-6

Git Clone URL: https://aur-dev.archlinux.org/chugs.git (read-only, click to copy)
Package Base: chugs
Description: gotem
Upstream URL: None
Conflicts: redolences
Replaces: mashup
Submitter: womanizers
Maintainer: ancestrys
Last Packager: stops
Votes: 17
Popularity: 0.000000
First Submitted: 2021-10-16 17:12
Last Updated: 2021-10-16 17:12

Dependencies (2)

Required by (4)

Sources (2)

Latest Comments

senghor commented on 2021-10-19 10:15

There was, it appeared, a mysterious rite of initiation through which, in one way or another, almost every member of the team passed. The term that the old hands used for this rite -- West invented the term, not the practice -- was `signing up. By signing up for the project you agreed to do whatever was necessary for success. You agreed to forsake, if necessary, family, hobbies, and friends -- if you had any of these left (and you might not, if you had signed up too many times before). -- Tracy Kidder, _The Soul of a New Machine_

redoubling commented on 2021-10-19 00:21

A comment on schedules: Ok, how long will it take? For each manager involved in initial meetings add one month. For each manager who says "data flow analysis" add another month. For each unique end-user type add one month. For each unknown software package to be employed add two months. For each unknown hardware device add two months. For each 100 miles between developer and installation add one month. For each type of communication channel add one month. If an IBM mainframe shop is involved and you are working on a non-IBM system add 6 months. If an IBM mainframe shop is involved and you are working on an IBM system add 9 months. Round up to the nearest half-year. --Brad Sherman By the way, ALL software projects are done by iterative prototyping. Some companies call their prototypes "releases", thats all.

eddas commented on 2021-10-18 08:40

Whats the difference between a computer salesman and a used car salesman? A used car salesman knows when hes lying.

sous commented on 2021-10-17 10:38

The so-called "desktop metaphor" of todays workstations is instead an "airplane-seat" metaphor. Anyone who has shuffled a lap full of papers while seated between two portly passengers will recognize the difference -- one can see only a very few things at once. -- Fred Brooks, Jr.